Quantcast

Hold the Bubbly: Soda and the Link to Diabetes

One 12-ounce soda a day can raise the risk of type 2 diabetes

BHM Edit Staff | 7/20/2013, 1 p.m.
Just one soda a day can up your diabetes risk.

Just one 12-ounce soda a day can raise the risk of developing type 2 diabetes by up to 22 percent, according to a recent study of more than 28,000 people in Europe.

The diabetes risk dropped to 18 percent when the investigators took into account people’s total calorie intake and body-mass index (BMI). Researchers believe total calorie intake and BMI play a role in the link between sugar-sweetened soft drinks and diabetes risk. The fact that diabetes risk fell only slightly when these two factors were taken into account might signal that the effect of sugar-sweetened soft drinks on diabetes goes beyond their impact on body weight, said study co-author Dora Romaguera, of the Imperial College London.

“Given the increase in sweet beverage consumption in Europe, clear messages on the unhealthy effect of these drinks should be given to the population,” Romaguera said.

The study’s findings are similar to previous research showing North Americans who consume sugar-sweetened soda have a 25 percent increased risk of diabetes. Fruit juice was not significantly associated with diabetes risk, according to the report.

Type 2 diabetes is near epidemic proportions in this country, particularly among African Americans. Nearly 5 million (18.7 percent) of us 20 or older have the disease, and a significant number of sufferers don’t know they have diabetes.