Sickle Cell

Family Planning for Sickle Cell Patients

This information is important for those who are planning to have children, particularly African Americans and those of West African ancestry. Children born into your family may be at risk of a disease. Hemoglobin A is the most common type and is normal.
If one parent is Normal (AA) and the other parent has Hemoglobin C Trait (AC), there is a 50% chance that the child will be Normal (AA) and a 25% chance that the child will be Hemoglobin C Trait (AC).
If both parents have Hemoglobin C Trait (AC), for each pregnancy there is a 25% chance the child will be Normal (AA); a 50% chance the child will be Hemoglobin C Trait (AC); and a  25% chance for Hemoglobin C Disease (CC).
If one parent has Hemoglobin C Trait (AC) and the other parent has Sickle Cell Trait (AS), there is a 25% chance the child will be Normal (AA); a 25% chance the child will have Hemoglobin C Trait (AC); a 25% chance for Sickle Cell Trait (AS); and a 25% chance for Sickle Cell Hemoglobin C Disease (SC Disease).

What do I do now?
Get yourself and family tested to see if you carry the trait for abnormal hemoglobin. If you take the test, ask your provider to perform a hemoglobin electrophoresis for accurate results. See your provider or call the Foundation for genetic counseling about your test results. This provides you with the facts to make an informed decision about have children.

Related:
Introducing: The Sickle Cycle Podcast

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